luc-reversadeLuc Reversade began his high-altitude adventure in the Vercors region of France, working firstly as a ski instructor, despite having qualified in hotel/restaurant school, eventually taking the decision to go full time into the latter. After the 1968 Winter Olympics, he came to the conclusion that the Vercours ski stations were often lacking enough snow, deciding that his future certainly lay in a station further up the mountains, Val d’Isere.
He started out by running a hotel « Les Cretes Blanches » (The White Peaks) for 3 years, also taking a punt on a restaurant called « La Petite Folie ».
At the end of the 70s the British « discovered » Val d’Isere, sending property rentals into orbit. So he chose that moment  to buy an even higher altitude restaurant, at La Daille, the top of the « Les Tommeuses » cable-car link. He had to work patiently for 5 hard years before being able to extend what has now become the self cafeteria, transforming the original spot into the basis of what has now become « La Folie Douce ».
One of the main elements of the Luc Reversade concept first made its appearance in 1994 :  a joint-venture project called « La Fruitiere ». A gourmet brasserie/cafe, initially planned to seat 50 but which in reality soon reached 200 and more. Its success convinced him that people loved the package he was offering, so he decided to develop it further still.

In 2000 he embarked on the construction of an outside bar, « La Buvette du Lapin », for which he decided to create a different kind of ambience, mixing in a hefty serving of music. Influenced by his trips to the dance beach bars of Ibiza, Turkey and Florida, he hit on the concept of doing the same thing, high up in the mountains, more specifically bang in the middle of the ski slopes. La Folie Douce Val d’Isere as we know it today was born.

The technical and logistical challenges involved in putting the project together were immense, largely because of the hardcore climatic conditions, which didn’t really allow the terraces to be open in December and January in view of the extreme cold. But nothing was going to stop him finding solutions, and he quickly found ways of making the new dream a new reality. Special, heated-column pumps to stop the beer freezing in the sub-zero temperatures. Special insulation for the loudspeakers so they could survive and function outside. Hoists and lifts to the equipment, furniture and drinks storage areas, to protect them from the cold. And the finishing touch : specially made heated tables to enable the paying public to enjoy the performing artists in any weather conditions, serving up quite literally some of the coolest vibes on Earth.